Thursday, April 12, 2007

How Willingly Are You To Help On Global Warming?

Finally, National Environment Agency (NEA) is lauching the campaign next week to encourage shoppers to use reusable bags.

Want to help to reduce on Global Warning? Simply buy the reusable bags from any seven food retailers, and use it to replace plastic bag.

I know it is not easy to change over night, as we all are so use to have all our shopping groceries in the plastic bag which was given free. But if we don't even want to make a little effort to help our earth now, what will happen to our next generation then?

Just around me, I already got negative feedbacks on this campaign. It is a sad thing, isn't it? If we are so concern about next generation, shouldn't we be doing more than only education, giving them tuitions in order to be top in the class, buying them toys or computer games and providing them good foods etc.

Now we are really talking about HOME that we need to provide without hurting the earth further.

So despite facing this, I will do my best by doing bit by bit first.
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See the facts from http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/singaporelocalnews/view/269779/1/.html-

* From next week, shoppers who still want a plastic bag will be asked to make a 10 cent donation. And starting in May, the first Wednesday of each month will be dedicated for shoppers to bring their own bag.

* This campaign is aimed at reducing the amount of waste created.

* Singapore consumes 2.5 billion plastic bags each year. "We noticed that over the years, more and more plastic bags are being used.

* Singapore incinerates its waste plastic bags and burning a tonne of them produces almost 2,900 kilograms of carbon dioxide - the gas that causes global warming.

* Global warming is the reason why glaciers melt, causing sea levels to rise. And that is a serious issue for islands like Singapore. And some plastic bags end up as rubbish, polluting beaches and clogging up waterways & drains. "Each year, we do waste studies in incineration plants, and found a large amount of plastic bags unused and thrown away by people as trash items. This indicates that there is huge room for us to cut down the wastage," says Yang Hong, Senior Environment Health Executive, Resource Conservation Department, NEA.

* And that's why, instead of promoting retailers to switch to biodegradable bags, NEA's strategy is to focus on public education, as everyone has a part to play.

9 comments:

etel said...

i am quite cynical.. so i'll think that the whole thing about this campaign issue is to EARN MONEY (look at NKF and youth organization!) and NOT saving the EARTH.

sad, but there are really evil ppl out there who just want money. look at habitats that were taken down by humans and killed several animal species...

tigerfish said...

Now, I actually use a shopping bag when I go nearby for grocery shopping. Coz I'm tired of collecting those plastic bags...kekkekeke.
Where I shop for groceries, they give out raffle ticket after your purchase in your own shopping bag. You drop your ticket in some sort like a "lucky-draw" box, then everyweek they pick on lucky shopper to receive a $25 gift-card or shopping voucher for the store. Cool, right?
But I guess bringing a shopping bag works when you buy little.
Thks for visiting my site for chocolates!

eastcoastlife said...

I support this. We should use environmentally friendly items for the sake of our future generations.

In Taiwan, all the shops do not give out plastic bag, you have to buy for 20 Singapore cents each.

Pauline said...

Etel, it never come across my mind that this campaign is abt earning $$$. I will feel very sad if this is really happening.

But if everyone is doing a little to save the earth, it will make a lot difference.

"There's a part for everyone". Remember this national song? It is so true in life that we need to play a part.

Pauline said...

Tigerfish, yr idea is great for encouragement at the early stage. I guess Singaporean might need this 'lucky draw' to kick off their old habit.

ECL, I heard that Taiwan is doing a good job for this envirnomental issue. Anything you knew abt TW contribution that we can learn fm them?

eastcoastlife said...

Besides this BYOB(Bring your own bags) campaign, they also have recycling bins.

There are volunteers, usually the elderly folks who would be stationed at these bins to help the residents dispose their junk in the correct bins. I find this very good wor, the people chit-chatting and helping one another, promotes neighbourliness.

And there are free classes for people who want to learn how to make art and crafts from their junk. Mostly the elderly, women and young children attend these classes. It makes full use of the junk. Some products are very pretty and useful.

Ahhh, I should have taken photos. Never mind, I'll be going to Taiwan soon and I shall write about it.

Pauline said...

They are doing good jobs. Waiting for your story then.

Cool Insider said...

Hey Pauline, I can understand the importance of generating less rubbish since landfill spaces are running out here. Also, plastic bags are items that are non bio-degradable and may be with us for another thousand years or more.

My question though, which I posed to my wife this morning, is how are we to dispose of our rubbish if we don't bag them? I can't imagine throwing down leftover food, fruit peels and vegetable parts directly down the chute. Any ideas how to circumvent this?

Pauline said...

This question has been asked by my sis before and I been thinking abt it.
Well, I guess at this moment what we can do a little is to reduce the number of plastic bags we took during shopping of groceries (like quitting smoking, you can't quit them completely). Then slowly we will have to buy our own rubbish bag. When this is taken out from own pocket money, I believe we will make full use of the rubbish bag. And perhaps not like now, we might already thrown and use another new plastic bag to replace when the rubbish was only half full.
Any other good idea? How ppl from other countries do har, I wonder?